Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay

We've been enjoying the heck out of Kevin Wada and Max Wittert's X-Men clothing line (previously: 1, 2) — these drawings transform Marvel Comics' strangest superteam into a collective of blasé performance artists who blow Xavier's endowment on smart drinks imported from the farthest reaches of the Shi'ar Empire.

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Here's Wada and Wittert's latest batch of mutant raiments. I want Moonstar's shoes in loafer form. Also, Jeanne-Marie and Jean-Paul Beaubier need to record a yé-yé single produced by Sébastien Tellier. Big ups to Cortexiphansession.

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay

Magneto

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Danielle Moonstar

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Bishop

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Scarlet Witch

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Nightcrawler

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Aurora and Northstar

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Ms. Marvel (she hung out with the X-Men during the early 1980s Chris Claremont era.)

Illustration for article titled Zany X-Men fashions turn Magneto into a preening popinjay
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Dead Girl (of The X-Statix)

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DISCUSSION

ctrexpope
C.T. Rex Pope

Oh man!, I love the word "popinjay," it has the best etymology ever: It moved into Arabic from some unknown African language. Went to Spain via the Moorish invasion. Moved into French (probably by trade routes). Then made it into English via the Normandy invasion of Southern England. The entire history of Western world all in one word!

late 13c., "a parrot," from O.Fr. papegai (12c.), from Sp. papagayo, from Arabic babagha', possibly formed in an African or non-I.E. language and imitative of its cry. Used of people in a complimentary sense (in allusion to beauty and rarity) from early 14c.; meaning "vain, talkative person" is first recorded 1520s. Obsolete figurative sense of "a target to shoot at" is explained by Cotgrave's 2nd sense definition: "also a woodden parrot (set up on the top of a steeple, high tree, or pole) whereat there is, in many parts of France, a generall shooting once euerie yeare; and an exemption, for all that yeare, from La Taille, obtained by him that strikes downe" all or part of the bird.