You Watch The Watchmen!

Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!

The official blog for Zack Snyder's Watchmen movie just released five new images, showing a first look at the costumes for the film's main characters. As with the previous images we've seen from this film, it's obvious Snyder's obsessive attention to detail will make Watchmen the most perfect homage to Dave Gibbons' art and designs you could imagine. Of course, copying Gibbons' 1980s images is the easy part: doing justice to Alan Moore's dark allegory of power-mad superheroes and Cold War paranoia will be much, much harder... especially so far removed from the Cold War.

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled You Watch The Watchmen!

I only have one nitpick about these gorgeous images, and that's that Nite Owl looks way more like Batman than Blue Beetle, the old-school superhero which Moore and Gibbons actually based him on. But having a Batman-esque figure in the film is probably a good thing for its marketability... even if he turns out to be as much of a schlub as his counterpart in the graphic novel. [Watchmen blog, thanks Abraham and Jamais!]

Advertisement

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

braak
Chris Braak

@shudderstep: Yeah, I'm not sure about that. The movie to me seemed to be a relatively interesting study, and almost homage to, terrorism, and the manipulation of ideas to achieve and resist domination. "Killing kiddies to get into power" is actually the straw-man, here—the atrocity, while undeniably terrible, is made more so by the fact that it is only a necessary step towards the mass manipulation of public consciousness. V's rebellion and his "Freedom" politics were as empty of actual argument and schemata—he had, for example, no idea how to build an actual working government in place of the one that was destroyed—but they were supposed to be. V is using the same mass-manipulation as the government in order to destroy that government, entirely for his own ends.

There is something that I find very compelling about the reversal of the approach to terrorism, of V's character's development as he realizes that Evey's the one that needs to destroy the building, and of the power of ideas to shape public action.

I'd argue—and have—that the anarchists "all dressed alike" is actually a superior choice in terms of the public consciousness to Evey taking on the persona of V. In the latter, the idea persists as a prod, but not as a kind of mass, epidemic change as it does in the former.

All that said, in the same way that I don't think a book is served by thinking of its adaptation into a movie as its natural end result, I don't think a movie's best condition is necessarily one of faith to its source material.