You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator

Ever wanted to own your own Starfleet shuttle? A Utah school district happens to have a working simulator of the Star Trek-inspired USS Galileo up for auction. The $1000 reserve hasn't been met, so you can still take Galileo home.

Thanks to Erica Brown for the tip.

Illustration for article titled You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator
Illustration for article titled You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator
Illustration for article titled You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator
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Illustration for article titled You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator
Illustration for article titled You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator
Illustration for article titled You Can Have Your Very Own Starfleet Shuttle Simulator

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DISCUSSION

rusticgroundsloth
RusticGroundSloth

For all who are interested here's the deal with this place (I worked there for quite a while). They have five "ships" with the Galileo here being the smallest. It's not a simulator in the "Star Tours" sense in that it doesn't have hydraulics or anything like that. It is on wheels so it does move laterally.

The Space center is officially named "The Christa McAcAuliffe Space Education Center" after the teacher that died when the Challenger exploded. It's located in an elementary school in Pleasant Grove, UT.

The gist of what goes on there is these guys write their own Star Trek universe missions, some of which are based on historical events. Each ship has multiple crew positions. The ship that is up for auction has room for 5. Four of the stations have computers, plus the captain. The largest ship takes up two large rooms in the school and has a maximum crew of 18.

The Space Center generally caters to school groups between 4th and 6th grade, but they do have older groups come on occasion. The ships are designed such that every position on the crew is essential - nearly everyone will have an opportunity to make a critical decision that will either save the crew, or kill them.

The campers (as we called them) were free to make whatever decisions they wanted during the course of the mission, and the staff had to react to their decisions. Including things like negotiating with aliens (Klingons, Romulans, etc.) and every mission always has some sort of exciting life or death climax/race to the finish.

We've actually had several kids that ended up working for NASA as a result of the experience they had at the Space Center. The real crux of the experience, however, was the teamwork aspect. You had to learn to work with all these people (many of whom you may have never met before) or you wouldn't get to the end of the mission and find out how the story ends.

Their website is: [www.spacecamputah.org]

and a picture of the replacement for this ship can be seen on their blog at:

[voyagerslog.blogspot.com] #startrek