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Yet Another Stephen King Adaptation Is Coming, This Time From the Writers of A Quiet Place

An artist’s rendition of The Boogeyman.
An artist’s rendition of The Boogeyman.
Photo: Stephen King Wiki

Another day, another Stephen King adaptation. This one has some extra juice, though, because it’s from the makers of Stranger Things and A Quiet Place.

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Deadline reports 21 Laps (the team behind Stranger Things) and writers Scott Beck and Bryan Woods (who penned A Quiet Place) have teamed up to option King’s short story The Boogeyman for 20th Century Fox. The story, originally published in 1973, is about a man who loses several of his children to an evil presence that lives in the closet. It was popularized as part of King’s 1978 short collection, Night Shift.

By our count, The Boogeyman is roughly the 12th or so King story that’s currently being adapted for the big screen, in addition to several for TV. We can thank the $700 million global box office of It for that.

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The Boogeyman has been made into several short films in the past (several of which you can currently watch on YouTube), all with King’s approval, but this is the first time it’ll be adapted as a feature for the big screen. And since it’s coming from two teams that obviously have a nose for the kind of chills and thrills audiences want, this one certainly feels like there’s a lot of terrifying potential.

[Deadline]

Entertainment Reporter for io9/Gizmodo

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DISCUSSION

There are so many other King tales that I’d consider much more suitable to a long-format film or series. I cannot imagine that yet another tiny, throw-away story is going to make its way to a feature-length film and it’s finally going to break the Stephen King Horror Movie Curse. His non-horror films typically give much better results, and while this is psychological in nature I see where they can give it the on-screen treatment every modern adaptation seems to have.