Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

What if natural products came with a list of ingredients?

Illustration for article titled What if natural products came with a list of ingredients?

Processed foods are notorious for their jaw-droppingly long lists of chemical-laden ingredients, each one sounding worse than the last. But as these detailed infographics show, even the simplest of foods are anything but.

Advertisement

These images were put together by James Kennedy, an Australian chemistry teacher.

Illustration for article titled What if natural products came with a list of ingredients?
Advertisement

"I want to erode the fear that many people have of 'chemicals',' and demonstrate that nature evolves compounds, mechanisms and structures far more complicated and unpredictable than anything we can produce in the lab," he told io9.

Illustration for article titled What if natural products came with a list of ingredients?

"This poster series breaks down all the major ingredients in popular natural foods—using E-numbers and IUPAC names instead of common names where they exist. Anthocynanins, for example, which are said to give blueberries their "superfood" status, are also known as E163."

Illustration for article titled What if natural products came with a list of ingredients?
Advertisement

"With these graphics, I wanted to show that Chemistry is everywhere."

All images James Kennedy; re-published here with permission.

Related: Americans – why do you keep refrigerating your eggs? | How flavor chemists made your food so addictively good

Advertisement
Advertisement

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

michaeladobbs
Michael Ann Dobbs

I love these!

One of the kids I babysit for started getting really interested in geology about 2 years ago and we started discussing things like "What are rocks made of?" which lead us to elements, the periodic table, etc. Trying to explain that everything is made out of chemicals to an eight-year-old who'd been told repeatedly, "Don't eat that, it has chemicals in it," was a lot of work. Partly, it worked because people just use the word incorrectly, what they meant were: toxins, poisons, pesticides, carcinogens, and preservatives. But now he understands that chemicals are just combinations of elements. Wish some adults had that level of vocabulary.