Researchers with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have acquired footage of Melanocetus (aka "the Black Seadevil"), a species of anglerfish never before filmed alive in its natural, deep-sea habitat.

Here's the video, with more details, from MBARI:

On Monday, November 17, MBARI Senior Scientist Bruce Robison was leading an [sic] dive using the remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts in Monterey Bay when he came across this amazing deep-sea anglerfish about 580 meters (1,900 feet) below the ocean surface. Robison commented, "This is the first time we've captured this fish on video in its habitat. Anglerfish, like this Melanocetus, are among the most rarely seen of all deep-sea fishes. The shining spot at the tip of the 'fishing pole' projecting from the fish's head is a glowing lure. The anglerfish uses its light to attract prey in its deep, dark habitat."

Encounters with deep-sea anglerfish are exceedingly rare. According to MBARI, fewer than half a dozen have ever been recorded by deep-diving research vehicles.

[MBARI]