Wanted's Original Ending Makes Contempt For Audience Into Art Form

Illustration for article titled Wanteds Original Ending Makes Contempt For Audience Into Art Form

While some critics may bemoan Timur Bekmambetov's movie adaptation of Wanted a beautifully-filmed piece of misogyny, they're apparently unaware that the movie's casual hatred and disdain for women is simply a more targeted version of the contempt that the original comic had for its own readers. Under the jump, two of the greatest, most over-the-top, pages of ending any comic has ever had. Potential spoilers, so be warned.

Charlie wasn't alone in noticing that Wanted was lazily misogynistic, forcing its hero Wesley to be "surrounded by dumb bitches... dragging him down. If only he could meet a woman with a killer bod and no personality whatsoever, apart from a vapid smirk"; Peter Bradshaw, of the British Guardian newspaper went much further in his scathing review:

This is a film where womankind is represented by irrelevant sleek babes and obese comic foils, an ugly whorehouse aesthetic which really does sock over its contempt for femaleness very, very powerfully indeed.

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In slight defense of the movie, however, it's worth pointing out that for true contempt, you can't get better than the original comic's literal "fuck you" to its own readers climax:

Illustration for article titled Wanteds Original Ending Makes Contempt For Audience Into Art Form
Illustration for article titled Wanteds Original Ending Makes Contempt For Audience Into Art Form

The best part of this sub-Fight Club conclusion may have been the fan reaction at the time, which seemed to largely range towards "Yeah! We are assholes! Thanks for telling it like it is!"

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DISCUSSION

@Pope John Peeps II:

I could care less if people agree with me or not- but the comments are whiney- the same old moanin' and groanin' about faithfulness to the source material and how it's all women hating and misanthropic.

So what?

I found it to be a pretty damn obvious parody (Jesus, he made Eminem the main character) of the whole world of Fight Club wish fufillment- and while you may consider it be clumsily written or plain awful (I'm "eh" on the matter)- only a dimwit couldn't see that you aren't supposed to hate the main character and everyone else in the book for their behavior. Celebration? I think not. It IS "dickish assholery".

Since I haven't seen the movie, I can't comment on what it brings to the table at all. But I'm pretty sure it won't be a parody.