Want To Sell Your Stuff At A Convention? Read This Comic First

Thinking about getting a table or booth at a comic book convention, but don't know the first thing about selling your wares? This comic is a handy primer for anyone looking to sell at a convention for the first time.

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Cartoonist Mark Monlux of The Comic Critic and The Return of Stickman! made Stickman's Tips for Having a Table at a Comic Book Convention as his 2011 project for 24-Hour Comic Book Day. While it isn't completely comprehensive (get your seller's permits, folks), it is chock full of things I wish I had known the first time I tabled at a convention—like the importance of a good tablecloth. It's geared specifically toward comic book conventions, but there's useful advice here for selling products at all sorts of conventions.

You can see the first few pages below, but check out the full comic at Monlux's website.

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Stickman's Tips for Having a Table at a Comic Book Convention [Mark Monlux via MetaFilter]

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DISCUSSION

liptakaa
Andrew Liptak

Another bit of advice - don't be an asshole to the people looking to speak / buy from you. I run a website about Geek stuff here in Vermont, and came across a comic artist at Boston Comic Con who worked as an artist for the Dr. Who comics. I've covered his stuff before, sought him out to say hello. Here's how our conversation went:

Me: "Hi, [introduction]."

Him: "Oh, hi." Head goes back down to drawing something.

Me: *Stands there awkwardly.*

Him: *realizing I was still standing there*. Can I help you with something?

Me: I guess not. Just wanted to say hello.

Now, he was randomly sketching something - not a commission (that I could tell), and I wasn't barging in or *demanding* attention. I basically wanted to say hello, exchange a couple of words and generally geek about other geek folks from Vermont in the same room in another state. His attitude pretty much assured that I'll never cover him again, no matter what he does. (And he complains a lot online about how nobody pays attention to his work.)