This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display

Illustration for article titled This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display

The extraordinary mummified remains of a 50-year-old woman discovered in a fetal position is set to go on display at a museum in France.

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As reported in The Independent, the 1,000-year-old mummy was discovered in 2012 at the ancient Peruvian settlement of Pachacamac near Lima. French archaeologists, who found the mummy crouched in a fetal position, have been careful to preserve the integrity of the remains by keeping it in the same configuration as when it was discovered.

Illustration for article titled This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display
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The new exhibition at the Musee de Confluences in Lyon will explore various human representations of death in different ages and cultures from around the world.

Illustration for article titled This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display

Two years ago, archaeologists from the Université Libre de Bruxelles excavated the 600 hectare Pachacamac site, where they found 70 bodies similar to the one on display. This mummy was found scattered around the bodies in the 1,000-year-old tomb, and they may have been ritually sacrificed.

Illustration for article titled This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display
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The Ichma peoples lived in the region from 800 A.D. to 1450 A.D. where they constructed 17 pyramids and worshipped the god Pacha Kamaq. Their culture and systems of belief were later absorbed by the Inca empire after it conquered the relatively small community. Archaeologists consider Pachacamac to be among the most important ancient settlement, equal to Machu Picchu and Nazca Lines.

Illustration for article titled This Incredible Peruvian Mummy Is About To Go On Public Display
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Read more at The Independent.

Images: Musee de Confluences/Independent

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DISCUSSION

AngryHistorian
AngryHistorian

So having worked in the funeral industry, and also having a keen interest in archaeology and ancient history, I just love this stuff. Not just for the information it gives us, but for the irony inherent in it.

To everyone here I pose a wonderful question, if you or any of your family members choose to be buried, are you okay with them or yourself being dug up later and put on display?

It really is an odd question how long before someone becomes a viable historical artifact?

Myself I'll be cremated and scattered, I'm a stickler about not wanting to take up space.