CBS' hit science escapism show Eleventh Hour has blossomed over the last two weeks, getting weirder, more futuristic, and pushing a "scientists are better than jocks" agenda. Spoilers ahead.

Last week's episode was positively endearing in its bizarreness. Though there are (thankfully) never conspiracies on Eleventh Hour, the episode "Spring Break Sucks" did give us a mystery flesh-eating bacteria that was clearly synthetic. And it was sexually transmitted. So there was a kind of nasty satisfaction in watching the skin get eaten off all the douchebags who date-raped drunk chicks. And there was a pro-condom message, as you can see in this awesome clip. I want to live in a universe where condoms protect against flesh-eating bacteria.

Turns out the synthetic bacteria was created by a NASA scientist who was getting revenge on the spring break douches who raped his daughter - causing her botched suicide attempt, which sent her into permanent vegetable land. Even more randomly cool was that he'd synthesized a bacteria that was a combination of the flesh-eater and something that would cause humans to go into suspended animation. Why did they need to throw that suspended animation thing in there? NO REASON EXCEPT FOR WEIRD SCIENCE COOLNESS. And that is why Eleventh Hour is slowly finding a place in my black heart.

Advertisement

The episode two weeks back, Titans, was just as gratuitously random in its researchers-gone-wildness. And it also had an anti-jock, pro-nerd message. Two sports medicine researchers start testing out their muscle-boosting serum on the siblings of the school's jocks to see if it will work on "non essential" people whose DNA is similar to their targets. Of course things go horribly wrong, and most of the siblings die. But one survives by getting put into a pressurized tank (the serum causes people to get the bends). Tank boy, it turns out, is a really talented engineer - and our geek hero Hood gives him a cool lecture about how being an engineer is just as important as being a jock. Awwww.

Now that the science is getting weirder, and the pro-rationality message has become almost Dick Dawkins-esque, we're going to give this already-popular show another chance.

Advertisement