These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images we've seen in ages

Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages

We've featured photographer Alexander Semenov's work before. At the time, we called the Russian biologist's images perhaps the most beautiful undersea photographs we'd ever seen.

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Semenov has been busy since we last checked in with him, adding to his ever-growing "Underwater Experiments" series. For the last several months, he's been churning out gorgeous views of ocean life that are consistently on-par with the images that first captured our attention. You can check out the entire series on Semenov's photostream, but some of our favorite images belong to a recent collection of photographs featuring the lion's mane jellyfish (aka Cyanea capillata). Not only is it the largest known species of jelly on Earth, it was also a recent internet sensation.

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Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages
Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages
Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages
Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages
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Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages
Illustration for article titled These jellyfish photos are some of the most gorgeous underwater images weve seen in ages
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You can check out the rest of this C. capillata series over on COLOSSAL, or visit Semanov's photostream to see the "Underwater Experiments" series in its entirety.

[Spotted on COLOSSAL]

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DISCUSSION

I thought were were calling them jellies these days, as they aren't fish.