Does having more money automatically make people happier? We know a little about how that works (and doesn't work) on an individual level, but what happens when we're talking not just about individuals, but about the happiness of entire countries?

Pew has released the results of a new global survey looking at levels of life satisfaction around the world as relates to their level of economic success and countries with higher GDPs do, indeed, report being happier.

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Until — that is — they don't, as you can see on this interactive chart that shows how the relationship between a rising income and rising happiness appears to taper off as income gets higher.

How the current GDP compared to the economy the country had seen over the course of the last seven years also mattered. In countries were the economic growth had been fast, the levels of reported happiness were higher even than other countries at a similar GDP. Conversely, countries that had seen a rapid drop over that span were more unhappy than their GDP counterparts.

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You can check out the whole report right here.

Charts: Pew Global Research

Top image: optimarc / Shutterstock

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