The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of Ghost in the Shell Anime

Image: Kodansha
Image: Kodansha

Although the movie faltered elsewhere, the future designs of this year’s Ghost in the Shell movie were definitely one of its greatest draws, building on a legacy that’s seen Motoko Kusanagi’s adventures expand from the page to animation. A new book takes a look at the artwork behind two decades of Ghost in the Shell, and we’ve got a look inside.

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Published by Kodansha, Ghost in the Shell README: 1995-2017 is the definitive look back at the genre-defining history of Ghost in the Shell’s myriad anime adaptations. It also reveals how the medium took Shirow Masamune’s beloved manga and turned it into an iconic piece of Japanese animation.

Tracking two decades of history that includes Mamoru Oshii’s seminal movie and its follow-up, Innocence, through Production I.G.’s blockbuster TV series Stand Alone Complex, and beyond—all the way up to this year’s live-action movie—the book is a celebration of one of the most famous anime and manga franchises in the world. It’s jam-packed with design art from across the films and TV series, alongside insight from and roundtable discussions with three crucial architects of Ghost in the Shell’s animated success: Oshii, Standalone Complex director Kenji Kamiyama, and Arise director Kazuchika Kise. Check out a few samples of the book’s chapters on the first two Ghost in the Shell movies below, making their debut here on io9:

Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
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Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
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Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
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Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime
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Illustration for article titled The Stunning Art Behind 20 Years of iGhost in the Shell /iAnime

Ghost in the Shell README: 1995-2017 is out tomorrow, November 7.

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James is a News Editor at io9. He wants pictures. Pictures of Spider-Man!

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therealkanra
The Real Kanra

Unlike a typical revolver, Togusa’s beloved gun fires the bullet at the bottom of the barrel. This reduces kickback, but makes it somewhat difficult to aim.

Unlike a typical revolver, Togusa’s beloved gun uses a semi-automatic action and the barrel fires the bullet from the cartridge in the bottom chamber of the cylinder. This barrel position reduces muzzle climb, but makes it somewhat difficult to aim.

Explanation

The Mateba Autorevolver is most notable for its semi-automatic operation. Unlike conventional revolvers, the Mateba is comprised of an upper and lower receiver; the former acting as a slide.

All firearms fire bullets through the center of the barrel. In the case of the Mateba, the barrel is aligned with the bottom chamber of the cylinder, rather than the top chamber as is common with revolvers. Thus, the barrel is positioned at the bottom of the upper receiver / slide. 

The position of the barrel lowers the bore axis, thus recoil is sent more in-line with the operator’s hand and arm. The effect of this is reduced muzzle climb as less energy rotates the firearm upwards. Recoil is reduced somewhat only due to the slide mechanism, which absorbs energy to cycle the cylinder and set the hammer in the cocked position.

The increased distance between the bore axis and sights causes inaccuracy when shifting from targets of varying distances. Thus, aiming at targets closer/farther than the distance at which the sights have been calibrated requires more adjustment.