The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short "The 3rd Letter"

Grzegorz Jonkajtys, director of Cannes-nominated animated short "Ark," writes to tell us that he's finished a new dystopian short called "The 3rd Letter." We've got art and a teaser from this nightmarish world of evil health insurance bureaucracy.

Here's the synopsis:

"The 3rd Letter" is a distinctive dystopian vision where humans utterly depend on health-care and technology to withstand the deteriorating climate. Set against a polluted, megalopolis world, the tragic tale of Jeffrey Brief (Rodrigo Lopresti) unfolds; Faced with the imminent loss of his crucial health insurance, Brief unwittingly unravels a dark truth behind his insurance company. He is subsequently pushed to unspeakable lengths in an attempt for survival.

Advertisement

Find out more about the movie at the official website.

Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Illustration for article titled The health insurance dystopia of grim, horrific short The 3rd Letter
Advertisement

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

maliburek
Mali Burek

So, here's my dark take on this stuff. Don't you think a majority of the world's problems are caused by people living too long? The improvement of healthcare causes more people to live longer, more babies to survive, and an increase in the overall population. More people = more resources consumed = more pollution, less available resources, competition for those resources (a la war).

It seems like messing with the grand design of mother nature/god/whatever, and delaying death has created larger problems. We can stop people from dying that by all account should have died had medical intervention not stepped in. I, for example, should have died from my brain tumor but medicine saved my life. I now consume and compete for resources (food, space, O2, etc.) and my kids will do the same. Had I died? Reduced impact on the environment—no progeny either. Expand that small impact to the millions of people who probably should have died at one point but didn't thanks to healthcare/medicine.

I'm not advocating for eugenics or living like the Middle Ages. I just find it interesting that our fear of our own mortality has led to healthcare that can (in some cases) prevent death and promote the rapid deployment of life. All these people living longer and longer lives become a drain on economies and the environment alike. What if we all died when we were supposed to? What if the human lifespan without medicine averaged to 30 or 40 years? What kind of world would it be now had those trends continued?

Ugh, the thoughts I have at work during lunch.