The Foreboding Soundtrack For Us Is Getting a Lush Vinyl Release

The Tethered family from Us.
The Tethered family from Us.
Image: Monkeypaw Productions

Appropriately, it’s a double LP.

As announced this week by Waxwork Records, an impressive vinyl release of the soundtrack for Jordan Peele’s Us is upon us, a double-LP release featuring the full score by Michael Abels, along with the movie’s distinctive remix of “I’ve Got 5 On It” by Luniz and “I Like That” by Janelle Monae. There will also be an included essay by UCLA professor, scholar, and activist Shana L. Redmond Ph.D.

Advertisement

But the highlight of this collection, aside from that incredible music, is the packaging. With illustrations by Edward Kinsella, the package comes in two LPs, one in “Metallic Brass Scissors” and the other in the color of “Tethered Red Jumpsuit.” And the illustrations themselves, as explained on the store page, are interactive: “[requiring] customers to use scissors to cut through family-member portraits to reveal their tethered doppelgangers lurking in the shadows.” Which might make this the only LP cover you’re supposed to cut open.

Also, it’s gorgeous?

The LP of Us. Pre-scissors.
The LP of Us. Pre-scissors.
Photo: Waxwork Records
Advertisement
And post-scissors.
And post-scissors.
Image: Waxwork Records

If you’re interested, the LP went on sale yesterday, and is available for the extremely reasonable price of $40 USD. And you can check out Us digitally or on Blu-Ray.


For more, make sure you’re following us on our new Instagram @io9dotcom.

Advertisement

io9 Weekend Editor. Videogame writer at other places. Queer nerd girl.

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

captaincontrarian
Captain Contrarian

Us was... pretty weak. Wanted to be a second Get Out with a Big, Important Message, but turned out to be mediocre home invasion/slasher/apocalypse movie.

“America is kept afloat by a permanent underclass” is a message worthy of exploration, but the execution is messy and incoherent. The Tethered contribute nothing to the American society of the movie, and they’re depicted as less-than-human, feral beings with movements reminiscent of brain damage. America’s real underclass is just regular people, not rabbit-eating clones.

It’s a nonsensical allegory that undermines its own message.