When the massive collections of stars known as galaxies collide, the results are spectacular. Here's a gallery of galaxies that are interacting ‚ÄĒ sometimes to the point of completely changing each other's shapes in the most dramatic ways imaginable.

The larger galaxy of Arp 273, known as UGC 1810, has a disk that is tidally distorted into a rose-like shape by the gravitational tidal pull of the companion galaxy below it, known as UGC 1813. Arp 273 lies in the constellation Andromeda and is roughly 300 million light-years away.

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(Photo by AP/NASA)

IRAS 20351+2521, a structure of dust, gas and blue star knots in the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox, 450 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

Arp 302, (also known as UGC 9618 or VV 340) a pair of gas-rich spiral galaxies in their early stages of interaction, 450 million light-years away from Earth.

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

Arp 272 (also known as NGC 6050 or IC 1179), collision of two spiral galaxies in the Hercules Galaxy Cluster, 450 million light-years away from us

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

Arp 256, two spiral galaxies in an early stage of interacting, 350 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

Arp 194, a group of several galaxies, along with "cosmic fountain" of stars, gas and dust that stretches over 100,000 light-years, about 600 million light-years from the Earth

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

NGC 1614 with two inner spiral arms, in the constellation of Eridanus, the River, about 200 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

NGC 520, a collosion between two disk galaxies that started 300 million years ago, and now it's in the middle stage of the process, about 100 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

Zw 96, located in the constellation of Delphinus, the Dolphin, about 500 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

VV 705 (or Markarian 848) with highly curved arms, in the constellation of Bootes, the Bear Watcher, approximately 550 million light-years away from Earth

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

Arp 240 (NGC 5257/8), two galaxies interacting with each other via a bridge of dim stars connecting the two galaxies. They're located in the constellation Virgo, approximately 300 million light-years away.

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(Photo by NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

UGC 9618 (also known as VV340) in the constellation of Boötes, about 450 million light-years away from Earth

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(via NASA)

A detailed look at the center of a collision between Antennae galaxies (known formally as NGC 4038/4039)

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(via Brad Whitmore/NASA)

Arp 148 (also known as the Mayall's Object) is the staggering aftermath of an encounter between two galaxies, resulting in a ring-shaped galaxy and a long-tailed companion. The collision between the two parent galaxies produced a shockwave effect that first drew matter into the center and then caused it to propagate outwards in a ring. This object is located 500 million light years away within the constellation of Ursa Major.

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(Photo by NASA/ESA/Hubble)

ESO 593-8 with a feather-like galaxy crossing, 650 million light-years away from us

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

ESO 077-IG014 (or ESO 77-14), in the constellation of Indus, the Indian, 550 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

NGC 3256 (or AM 1025-433), the relict of a collision in the Hydra-Centaurus supercluster complex, about 175 light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

NGC 5331, a pair of spiral galaxies interacting with each other in the constellation Virgo, the Maiden, approximately 450 million light-years away

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)

A composite image of the Antennae galaxies, with photos of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, about 45-65 light years away

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(Photo by NASA/CXC/SAO/J. DePasquale, NASA/JPL-Caltech and NASA/STScI)

Bonus: NGC 3314, two spiral galaxies located in the constellation Hydra, between 117 and 140 million light-years away from Earth. These two galaxies aren't colliding, it's only caused by the optical effect of overlapping.

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(via NASA/ESA/The Hubble Heritage)