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Side by side comparison: "Let The Right One In" vs. the American remake

Illustration for article titled Side by side comparison: Let The Right One In vs. the American remake

So, how different is the remake version of Let The Right One In, retitled Let Me In, from the original? We've seen the trailer - now let's pick apart the differences between the two movies.

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Both films are about a mysterious new child in a small apartment complex, and the young little boy who befriends her. As the plot moves forward you discover the mystery child craves blood, and eventually companionship from a new playmate. Let's see if the foreign film translated well into Matt Reeves' picture.

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First, the Americanized version seems to have no qualms with giving it all up right out the gate as little Chloe Moretz walks into her new home barefoot through the snow, with a coffin-like trunk in tow. The Swedish version let you do a lot of guessing at first. But yes, they both love going barefoot. All. The. Time.

Illustration for article titled Side by side comparison: Let The Right One In vs. the American remake

Eli/Abby's attack under the bridge is surprisingly similar, though we're not sure if she's as exposed in the original, which lead to people looking for the murderous little Eli. What's really interesting is that both films implemented the cat growl vampire strike right before the tykes went for the victim's throat.

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Both Oskar and Owen get their kicks listening to their vampire neighbor.

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But the big difference in the Americanized version is that while listening, Owen gets a face-full of demon, exorcist style. Strange. Did I miss this in the original?

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Hemorrhaging blood still seems to be a problem for a vampire if not properly invited in.

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Upside down draining still seems like the ideal way to get blood from both Swedish and American prey.

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Both Oskar and Owen are very stab-happy, have an intense hatred for trees and are prone to run about shirtless.

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The American vampire seems to have retained her ability to scale random trees and buildings. Super strength = intact.

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The older gentleman/caretaker of the vampire girl/boyfriend appears to be dumped in the same manner. Sad.

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Bodies are still being discovered in the same manner. Love the close up in Reeves' US trailer.

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Vampiric light sensitivity is also still a big issue. Let's hope the vampire cat effect is intact as well.

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And finally, at the very end of the trailer there's a splash in a pool, possibly in reference to the final pool scene in the original. Which is easily one of the most amazing things we've seen in years. I almost feel bad that they have to find a way to reinterpret this scene, because the original was so flawless. Either way I hope Reeves puts his own touch on the climactic moment.

Illustration for article titled Side by side comparison: Let The Right One In vs. the American remake
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All in all, there really seem to be a lot of similarities, and the tone feels about the same. Sure it's a little stylized and a bit "cooler" than the original but that could just be the rock music blasting over the whole US trailer. We're going to need to see more, and without the soundtrack. But color us curious.

If you want to see more screen grab comparisons between these two versions, check out our friends over at UGO. Who picked up on a few things that I didn't, like a Star Wars shout-out and bloody backside hugs.

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DISCUSSION

crbrennan
Spaceknight

You see a similarity in hemorrhaging blood?

I see a look of sadness, hurt and a bit of fear in the original. Admittedly it's only a shot and not a scene, but the shot of the remake doesn't seem to convey those emotions. It's more angsty-emo-threatening. Not to mention the whole quantity of blood involved and where it's coming from - crying blood is quite creepy. (Course, that could be a shot from early in the scene.)

Then let's move on to the bridge attack. Again, I seem to be caught on the differences. In the original, it's a large footpath under a bridge. Open. "Safe". (hence, the irony, fitting with the child vampire.) In the remake, it looks like a sewer pipe. Not really the same thing as a well-traveled road! A sewer pipe is the typical horror movie "oh don't go in there what are you stupid?!?"

I see a difference between a vampire in the far corner of a shadow of an open road, and already right up against you in a tight tunnel. Is one better? I won't take sides there, but I will say they're not the same in tone.

This is generally what happens in Americanizations and/or modernizations. For simpler example, I bet the shot of the body out the window was a dummy thrown from a window in the original, and I bet it's a composite CG "perfect" shot in the remake. Is one "right"? I don't know, but one looks more realistic than the other, and thus it's a change in tone. I tend to find the realism take to be more creepy.