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Short Film Premiere: Cockpit: The Rule of Engagement

We're pleased to host the online premiere of award-winning short film Cockpit: The Rule of Engagement, which just showed at Comic-Con this morning. It's the action-packed story of warfare at the edge of the galaxy, where an alien enemy can mess with human minds — as well as blowing up ships.

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Cockpit has pretty awesome special effects, too. It was written and directed by indie filmmaker Jesse Griffith. Here's the official synopsis:

It is the story of a squadron of space fighter pilots, stranded in their cockpits deep in enemy space, struggling with reality and delusion as they are hunted by mind controlling aliens.

"COCKPIT: THE RULE OF ENGAGEMENT" is a standalone chapter from the same universe which follows the Carrier Captain (Ronny Cox) who must decide if it is worth risking the security of Earth to save a suffocating pilot who may or may not have been corrupted by the mind controlling aliens . . .

Ronny Cox ("Total Recall", "Robocop", "Deliverance") stars as the Captain who must decide if his pilot may land and live, or be left to die in space after returning from a botched bombing run. Hellena Taylor (the voice of "Bayonetta" from Sega's hit video game) plays the cold Government Agent who reminds the Captain that the life of one man is not worth the risk of a fatal breech of security - the loss of the Space Carrier itself. Karl Champley (host of "Home", "DYI: To The Rescue" and "Wasted Spaces") is the pilot who lost his wingman in an asteroid belt ambush and now he is running out of air, powerless to prove he is not under alien control.

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Learn more on the official Cockpit website.

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DISCUSSION

falseprophet
falseprophet

I appreciated that for once, the obstructionist civilian bureaucrat arguing for sensible precautions turned out to be right. That's about all I appreciated about this.

Also, I'm probably reading way too much into it, but it came across as a metaphorical justification for neocon imperialism: "We can't negotiate or talk to the enemy, or they'll corrupt us with their dangerous ideas. Diplomacy's not an option; nuking the site from orbit's the only way to be sure."