Romero's Undead Island Trying To Corner The Market On Water Zombies

Illustration for article titled Romeros Undead Island Trying To Corner The Market On Water Zombies

George Romero's latest zombie flick owes us all a heap of awesome after the disappointing Diary Of The Dead, and so far it sounds pretty good (especially since it's not based on the original DOTD characters, but side charactersinstead). Imagine a zombie outbreak so terrible that a group of survivors are marooned on an island and have to fend off attacks from the dreaded water zombies.Romero told Movieset that:

“We’re shooting underwater zombies,” Chartier revealed. “They’re swimming, grabbing people’s legs, pulling them down. It’s a lot of fun.”

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Good, good — methinks the World War Z people will be pissed to hear this, but it sounds like more of a Lord of the Flies take on the zombie genre. At least I hope it's more LOTF and not Survivor. Shock Around The Clock was told by Romero:

“It’ll be about three weeks in [past the outbreak] and it doesn’t start with the people in the mansion [at the end of Diary]. It starts with the blonde who drove away and the national guardsmen who robbed the people. So those are the only characters that return. What it’s about is tribalism. How the internet creates a Hatfields and McCoys situation. It’s on an island, where people have been lured by someone on the net as a safe haven, but really what these guys are trying to do is hold them up at the boat docks.”

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Wow Hatfields and McCoys-type fighting, fantastic. Will there be banjos? Either way I like the idea. It sounds relatively new (for a zombie pic) and I still love everything Romero. [Movieset and Shock Around The Clock]

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DISCUSSION

While this does sound particularly schlocky for Romero, I can see ways for this sort of thing to work if taken in the right direction, and I think Diary of the Dead started to highlight this trend. Diary is basically a film of two parts, the digs at the Youtube society we now live in, and a healthy dose of satire targetting the tropes of the zombie genre (and the wider horror genre as well).

I think you could have a lot of fun with this. If we consider Romero's films as holding a mirror up to society, we can assume that the fictional world also has its own fictional zombie films. If the film covers a group of survivors who think they know how to survive from watching films, but have those conventions thrown out of the window (eg. swimming zombies), it throws up some interesting story potential.