Open Channel: What's Your Best Star Wars Story?

This photo will make more sense once you read the article.
This photo will make more sense once you read the article.
Photo: StarWars.com

One of the reasons Star Wars is so popular is because so many people feel such a personal connection to it. It’s not just a series of films. It’s a part of our lives and who we are as people.

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But how? We’re guessing besides Rogue One and Solo, everyone has a Star Wars Story of their own. Probably more than one, in fact. Something that happened in your life—a moment, an experience, or an event—that involved Star Wars and made you the fan, and maybe the person, that you are.

So on this May the 4th, we want to hear from you: What’s your best Star Wars story?

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For me, that’s a difficult question. I have a lot of them, many of which I’ve written about on this website. Seeing the Special Editions in 1997. Waiting in line for tickets. Being a part of history with Triumph. The list goes on and on. But here’s a more formative one along the lines of what we’re looking for.

It was Christmas sometime in the early to mid-1980s, and the thing I wanted most in the world was the Millennium Falcon. It was my favorite ship (still is), and the toy, one of the biggest and most expensive at the time, was number one on my Santa Claus wish list.

However, when I woke up Christmas morning I was a little disappointed. Being the sneaky kid I was, I knew the size of the box and there was nothing that matched it under the tree. Santa shafted me. But, I knew I was fortunate no matter what, so I opened my presents and kept my mouth shut. I knew Santa did everything for a reason and, to be honest, I hadn’t been the best kid that year.

When we finished opening presents, my mom asked me if I liked what Santa brought. I said yes, but was really hoping for that Falcon. My mom asked if I thought I deserved the Falcon and I told her yes, but maybe not. I wasn’t really sure. That must have been the right answer, because that’s when my dad said, “Wait, what’s that behind the couch?” Sure enough, there was another present behind the couch. A big one. One I hadn’t seen earlier. I ran over, smiling ear to ear, and tore the paper to shreds. It was a Dukes of Hazzard Race Car set.

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I’m kidding, of course it was the Millennium Falcon.

I still have that Falcon to this day. And though it’s missing pieces, all banged up, and in a garage 3,000 miles from my current home, it’s still a part of me. Just like Star Wars.

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Now it’s your turn—share your best Star Wars story in the comments, and pretend bonus points for including pictures!

Entertainment Reporter for io9/Gizmodo

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DISCUSSION

James Whitbrook

I have plenty of ones (especially, unsurprisingly, involving Star Wars toys—it’s almost like an involuntary response that I can smell the plasticky rubber off the Hasbro/Kenner Darth Vader at a moment’s notice), but my favorite of all is more recent, from Star Wars Celebration Europe in 2016.

It was the first time I’d gone to one, and the first time full stop I’d covered a big con in person for io9 (the Media badge had Poe on, so fuck yeahhh). It was exhausting and stressful, but you can’t really complain about living and breathing Star Wars with thousands of people for three days in a row having that be your job. But on the final day, the Sunday, I’d brought my brother a ticket so we could spend the day together, and we were up at a frankly criminal hour—but it was worth it, to get wristbands for Carrie Fisher’s panel (guest starring Gary Fisher).

To be in that room with her, to watch her command the attention of me, my brother, and hundreds of other people like she was an actual goddamn space general instead of just one on screen, was magical. I still can’t remember a time I’ve laughed so hard I’ve cried, so many times as I did in that room, as Carrie regaled that audience with tale after tale. It was the first time, and sadly the last, I’d ever seen her in person, and I will always treasure that memory now that’s she’s gone.