John Carter, As Imagined by 12-Year-Old Andrew Stanton and teenage Michael Chabon

Illustration for article titled emJohn Carter,/em As Imagined by 12-Year-Old Andrew Stanton and teenage Michael Chabon

Before he was winning Oscars for Wall-E and Finding Nemo, John Carter director Andrew Stanton was a teen scribbling Tharks in his personal notepads. In fact, a penchant for fan art is something that all three of the head honchoes working on John Carter share. Take a look at the childhood Barsoomian doodles from Stanton, screenplay scribe Michael Chabon, and Pixar alum Mark Andrews.

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When we visited John Carter's edit bay months back, Stanton joked that before he started working heavily on John Carter, people had to prove that they were die-hard Edgar Rice Burroughs fans. This wasn't a problem for second unit director/writer Mark Andrews and author Michael Chabon, as each of them had pages of Princess Of Mars doodles and Thark drawings from their childhoods. Behold!

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Illustration for article titled emJohn Carter,/em As Imagined by 12-Year-Old Andrew Stanton and teenage Michael Chabon

Here's a sketch of the Thark by Andrew Stanton, at the age of 12...

Illustration for article titled emJohn Carter,/em As Imagined by 12-Year-Old Andrew Stanton and teenage Michael Chabon

Another Thark sketch by John Carter's Mark Andrews, who was also the head of story on The Incredibles and the director of Pixar's latest movie Brave.

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Illustration for article titled emJohn Carter,/em As Imagined by 12-Year-Old Andrew Stanton and teenage Michael Chabon

Childhood sketch from John Carter scribe Michael Chabon, the author of Wonder Boys and The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. In our recent interview with Chabon, the author admitted that he found the Edgar Rice Burroughs' books at the age of 12 at a mall in Columbia, Maryland. It was as if this "incredibly arresting object" had just materialized.

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DISCUSSION

yankton
Yankton, née Spacemonkey Mafia

The second image must have been a copy, correct? Perhaps it was done a few years later than the top image, as the perspective and composition are completely different, but I can't shake the vibe that the line quality has the visual equivalent of a phonetically pronounced word.

Especially in the complexity of the cloth, jewelry and shadows.

That's all academic, though. These are pretty neat, especially Chabon's strange little robot.