Is Christopher Nolan's Interstellar really about climate disaster?

Illustration for article titled Is Christopher Nolans emInterstellar/em really about climate disaster?

Christopher Nolan is filming his hard science-fiction movie Interstellar, and we couldn't be more excited. Originally written by Jonathan Nolan for director Steven Spielberg, Interstellar is based on the theories of CalTech physicist Kip Thorne. But now we may know why humans need to go to another planet.

According to the Fort MacLeod Gazette, this film is also known as Flora's Letter, and it's set in a future where the environment has collapsed and there's no more food. In this dire future, "corn is the last crop to be cultivated on earth and the scientists embark on a journey through a worm hole into other dimensions in search of somewhere other crops can be grown."

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And the first set photos from the filming (via the Gazette and the Lethbridge Herald/Ian Martens) reveal that this future Earth is a dry place, where dust storms are a constant hazard and everybody wears protective surgical masks. Check out a few of the photos of Matthew McConaughey, John Lithgow, Jessica Chastain and some other actors on the set with Christopher Nolan:

Illustration for article titled Is Christopher Nolans emInterstellar/em really about climate disaster?
Illustration for article titled Is Christopher Nolans emInterstellar/em really about climate disaster?
Illustration for article titled Is Christopher Nolans emInterstellar/em really about climate disaster?
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Illustration for article titled Is Christopher Nolans emInterstellar/em really about climate disaster?
Illustration for article titled Is Christopher Nolans emInterstellar/em really about climate disaster?
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[MacLeod Gazette and Lethbridge Herald, via ScreenRant]

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DISCUSSION

Khementari
Khementari

Give some poor, starving, science fiction authors a break. You don't have to hire them to write the screenplay, but throw them a little cash to develop original ideas and treatments that haven't been deployed and exploited ad nauseum in print, film, and digital media over the last 150 years. I couldn't tell Chris and his brother how to make a film (nor Ridley, nor Neil B., nor JJ, nor Zack, nor... etc., etc....); what makes these celluloid space cowboys think they can create nuanced, quality SF without the necessary chops?

Very disappointing news about Interstellar, if true.