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Intervalography Captures Patterns That Are Invisible to the Naked Eye

Illustration for article titled Intervalography Captures Patterns That Are Invisible to the Naked Eye

This strange photo is of a real place, but it looks like it was photoshopped it like crazy. In fact, it wasn't. By combining strips from 100 photographs of the same thing into a particular kind of pattern, photographer Alan Grinberg has invented an entirely new photographic technique he calls Intervalography. Find out how the trippy, stuttering effect was achieved after the jump.

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Illustration for article titled Intervalography Captures Patterns That Are Invisible to the Naked Eye

- Set up your camera to take 100 photographs of the same exact scene @ 1 photo per minute.
- Lay out all the pics in order of time from left to right.
- OK, that's way too long for the human eye to take in. Let's take a pair of scissors or a paper cutter and slice a narrow strip from each pic. Make sure you get a strip from the same part of each photo, on every photo.
- Put them all together, in time sequence, from left to right.
- Because clouds move, suns set, and waves crash, you get a pretty cool (and always different) effect.
- Don't have the patience for 100 photographs? Try it with 50. Images by Alan Grinberg

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Alan Grinberg main page via NotCot

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annaleenewitz
Annalee Newitz

@zeppelined: Basically, yeah. We want to fill your brains with the ideas that can inspire science fiction, as well as science fiction itself.