Seriously, the Chronicle of Higher Education is wondering. Which one of these characters, who tend t0 be great at stopping evil plans to take over the world but aren't really the most stable otherwise, would you entrust with undergraduate and graduate education?

Andy Thomason wondered about this question, discounting both Thor and Black Widow for lack of experience with universities. He likewise discounted Bruce Banner:

Right off the bat, you can count out Robert B. Banner, otherwise known as the Hulk. While Mr. Banner has three Ph.D.'s from the California Institute of Technology, at some point he's bound to go berserk and lay waste to half the Faculty Senate. That's a PR disaster.

He may be right about PR, but I bet the Faculty Senate would be really well-behaved after. He discounts Doctor Strange, since he refused a teaching job in the past. Institutional loyalty issues rule out Carol Danvers and corporate/military connections rule out Tony Stark. Although I would love to see the student protests agains that,

The two that Thomason is most positive about are Steve Rogers and T'Challa:

The most likable candidate is probably Steven Rogers, also known asCaptain America. Yes, he's a stranger to academe, but he's a superb leader and all-around great person. Think Adm. William H. McRaven, the incoming chancellor of the University of Texas system, but trade the college degree for super strength. Unfortunately, Mr. Rogers's extensive ties with the U.S. military might raise some eyebrows, and you don't need the protests. Invite him to be your commencement speaker, not your president.

... Which leaves T'Challa, also known as the Black Panther. Hailing from the African nation of Wakanda, the Black Panther knows what it means to think globally. He's got a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Oxford and is an accomplished inventor, scientist, and politician. Considered one of the eight smartest people on earth, the Black Panther also fought apartheid in South Africa. Dare your Board of Trustees say no to that résumé?

Advertisement

Missing from this analysis? Charles Xavier, who has more experience teaching than anyone else on this list. He also tends to put his students in harm's way by training them as sueprheros, but experience is experience. We've also somehow missed out on a Deadpool run university, which would produce the most genre-savvy students of all time.

Who else did The Chronicle for Higher Education miss out on this list? And have they been too harsh on some of the candidates?