You can approach this puzzle from two very different angles. Which will you choose?

This week's puzzle was submitted by reader Michelle G., who found it in a back issue of MIT's Technology Review. "I like this puzzle because there are two very different approaches to solving it," she writes. "How you choose to tackle it says a lot about what kind of puzzle-solver you are, and maybe the kinds of puzzles you enjoy."

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Sunday Puzzle #12: A Saying In a Star

The numbers from 1 to 16 were written in the circles of the diagram below in such a way that the sum of any four numbers in a straight line was the same. Then the number 1 was replaced by the first letter of a saying, number 2 by the second letter, etc. The final configuration is shown. What was the saying?

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We'll be back next week with the solution – and a new puzzle! Got a great brainteaser, original or otherwise, that you'd like to see featured? E-mail me with your recommendations. (Be sure to include "Sunday Puzzle" in the subject line.)

Art by Jim Cooke

SOLUTIONS To Sunday Puzzle(s) #11: Riddles From A Recluse

Last week, I asked you to solve a series of seven riddles by author Wallace Pustinjak that were inspired by The Hobbit. So many of you got these correct or partially correct in the comments, that I've decided to simply include the answers here. WARNING: Here be spoilers. If you haven't read the riddles yet, go do so, then come back here when you're ready for the reveal.

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Riddle I Answer: Hunger

Riddle II Answer: The moon

Riddle III Answer: Footprints

Riddle IV Answer: Wind

Riddle V Answer: Months of the year

Riddle VI Answer: A tongue

Riddle VII Answer: Wings

Previous Weeks' Puzzles

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