How to organize a dictionary of made-up languages

Illustration for article titled How to organize a dictionary of made-up languages

Stephen Rogers has put together the ultimate guide to conlangs, or made-up languages, from Klingon and Elvish to Lojban and Esperanto. In his new book A Dictionary of Made-Up Languages, you can learn about Na'vi pronunciation and the word games that mathematicians play. It's the perfect book for word geeks, as well as anybody who loves language and linguistics. We've got an excerpt from the introduction, below.

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You can pick up a copy of the book via Amazon or your favorite local bookstore.

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Illustration for article titled How to organize a dictionary of made-up languages
Illustration for article titled How to organize a dictionary of made-up languages
Illustration for article titled How to organize a dictionary of made-up languages
Illustration for article titled How to organize a dictionary of made-up languages
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DISCUSSION

Oh crap. I want that. I love linguistics. I had my weekly linguistic class this afternoon. It's awesome. But most "alien" language are unrealistic in one important aspect - there is only one variety of it. And when there is more than one, they are all inter-comprehensible varieties. Klingons speaks Klingon. There are billions of billions of Klingons out there, on hundreds of planets. And they all speak the same language? Yeah, no. How many lanbuages do humans, on one planet, speaks? In the thousands - we have no specific number, because that would require being able to define where a language begins, and when language stops.