Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome

Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome

We recently ran an interview with Thor writer Walt Simonson in which he mentions an Alien movie adaptation he worked on for Heavy Metal back in 1979 with Archie Goodwin and John Workman. I'd never read it before, so I looked it up. And guess what? It's an absolute jaw-dropper.

Is this bad boy in print? I'm pretty sure it's not (and that's a travesty). You can find it over at Grantbridge Street (link NSFW), and here are some of the comic's gorgeous spreads.

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Illustration for article titled Holy hell, the 1970s Alien comic book was awesome
Advertisement

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

lightninglouie
lightninglouie

Nah, it's been our of print for thirty years or more. Alien was the first in a short lived line of Heavy Metal "Illustrated Story" movie adaptations, which would be simultaneously serialized in the magazine and released in trade paperback. The second was an adaptation of Spielberg's 1941 by future Alan Moore collaborators Rick Veitch and Steve Bissette. (Needless to say, many liberties were taken with that adaptation, and the result was much more entertaining than the actual film.). There was a third adaptation, this time of Peter Hyams' Outland by Jim Stetanko, but I don't think there was any book version. This was clearly in response to the success of Marvel's movie tie-in comics like Star Wars, but whereas they were limited to family friendly films with sub-PG level dialogue, the HM versions were free to be as profane and gory as they pleased, with all the nudity and cussin'.

Incidentally, the Alien book was the first graphic novel to reach the NYT bestseller list. Why Dark Horse hasn't tried to secure the rights is beyond me.