Head-exploding science fiction flick Scanners gets a TV show

These days, director David Cronenberg does Oscar-style fare like A History of Violence, but back in the 1980s he made splattery body horror cheesefests. Scanners is one of the best of the lot, giving us a spooky, memorably gross, look at the lives of outcast telepaths who were the victims of government experiments. Also, there were a lot of exploding heads. Now, Weinstein Co.'s Dimension Films is producing a TV series based on Cronenberg's weird flick.

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According to Deadline Hollywood:

The original plan was to mount a theatrical remake, with David Goyer tapped to write two drafts, and Rene Malo, Clark Peterson and Pierre David signed as producers. But with the recent resurgence of genre TV dramas like AMC's monster hit The Walking Dead, Dimension started also considering a small-screen adaptation. According to insiders, it was Dimension principal Bob Weinstein and Aja who conceived of the plan to transform the Scanners property into a TV show.

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Another one of Cronenberg's films, The Dead Zone, was a successful TV series in the early 2000s.

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DISCUSSION

jamesryan04
James Ryan

Said Annalee:

"These days, director David Cronenberg does Oscar-style fare like A History of Violence, but back in the 1980s he made splattery body horror cheesefests..."

And what he does these days is that far removed from the earlier body of work? NAKED LUNCH and eXistenZ could well have been done by him back in his earlier days, and it would not be inappropriate to apply "splattery bloody horror" as a description to EASTERN PROMISES. And the trailer from A DANGEROUS METHOD suggests that the steps between where he was back in the day and now are not that many: an S&M film that just happens to discuss the split between Freud and Jung still has the DNA of a "cheesefest" in its cells...

I'd argue that the difference between early Cronenberg and later Cronenberg is not so much that he's move radically away from his earlier work, so much as his audience are now embracing him more fully and allowing him to take us there.

Which means we may end up with a reassessment of Herschell Gordon Lewis any day now...