Better late than never? The head of German serial killer Fritz Haarmann — known as "The Butcher of Hannover" and "The Vampire of Hannover" — was cremated after spending 89 years bobbing in formaldehyde.

An AP report cites Goettinger Tageblatt newspaper's intel that the University of Goettingen's medical department, which had been holding on to Haarmann's head for research purposes, did the deed late last year.

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Haarman, who murdered at least 24 young men between 1918 and 1924, was convicted of murder after a sensational trial. Criminal Minds sets the scene:

Fritz's trial began on December 4, 1924. As the term "serial killer" had not been coined yet, there were no words to describe Fritz other than "werewolf" or "vampire" ... A notable aspect of the case was the shock that came to the public after the discovery that Fritz was a police informant, and therefore, the police never came to suspect him of the murders even though witnesses pointed him out as being with his last victims.

Fritz's trial lasted for two weeks and required 200 witnesses to explain their accounts. He was found guilty of murdering all but three of the victims tied to him and sentenced to death by guillotine. His last words [were] "I repent, but I do not fear death."

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The Butcher killings were among the inspirations for Fritz Lang's 1931 crime thriller M.

Via Huffington Post.

Image via Grotesque and Arabesque.

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