Gloriously Gruesome Sci-Fi Cult Classic Event Horizon Might Become an Amazon Series

The ship at the center of Event Horizon is both beautiful and deadly.
The ship at the center of Event Horizon is both beautiful and deadly.
Image: Paramount

I have often proclaimed my love for Paul W.S. Anderson’s 1997 sci-fi horror film Event Horizon, about a deep-space vessel that goes to a very bad dimension and returns with mind-warping powers, and features Laurence Fishburne barking the immortal line “Fuck this ship!” A TV series might happen, you say? Fuck YES!

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Amazon and Paramount Television are working on developing the potential series, according to Variety, which reports that Adam Wingard is aboard as executive producer and director. Wingard is kind of the perfect choice, since his filmography includes sci-fi (Godzilla vs. Kong, coming next March) but skews heavily toward horror (he also made The Guest, You’re Next, Death Note, and the Blair Witch reboot).

As Hollywood legend tells it, the 1997 Event Horizon (which also stars Sam Neill, Kathleen Quinlan, Jason Isaacs, and Joely Richardson; it was scripted by Philip Eisner) fell victim to some brutal editing-room cuts that made the end result lack a certain coherence—a quality that’s helped make the film a cult classic today.

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A TV series could certainly fill in some of the plot holes...black holes, if you will...while also digging deeper into the story’s extensive horror elements. And if Event Horizon gets put to series, Amazon will be one step closer to becoming a sci-fi powerhouse, especially considering its commitment to The Expanse.

Just, if an Event Horizon series gets made, please let it be better than Nightflyers. We’ll bring you more on this one as we know it.


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DISCUSSION

One of the few movies to give me nightmares. It was probably 3-4 MONTHS before I could close my eyes without seeing the guy smiling as he held his eyes in the palm of his hand. Just how much of a story is there left to tell with a full series? How is that going to work? Start with Sam Neill’s character years prior? It’s a singular event occurrence that we’re interested in. The ship doesn’t survive the movie and it’s not like the crew ever went on another haunted ship like that. Do we follow the crew on the maiden/only voyage of the Event Horizon? Not knowing what happened when they disappeared adds to the mystique. Do we really need some kind of prequel that builds up to them disappearing? People who aren’t familiar with the movie would probably dislike that.

This series should probably just not exist.