Delilah S. Dawson's Phasma Novel Has Its Own Soundtrack, And It's Rad

Image: Del Rey
Image: Del Rey

This is no surprise, because Dawson’s music of choice for accompanying the Phasma novel is a heady mix of Mad Max: Fury Road and Star Wars. What’s not to love about that?

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Speaking at the Lucasfilm Publishing panel at New York Comic Con today, Dawson revealed that she crafted a Spotify playlist of music to go with her process of writing the recently-released Phasma, one that we can now all listen along to as we read the finished book. And, as you might suspect, it’s a pretty fabulous playlist—mainly because it’s one part Junkie XL’s Fury Road work; one part Michael Giacchino’s excellent, quickly put-together Rogue One work; and one part John Williams in the form of The Force Awakens soundtrack.

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Fury Road’s frenetic, intense music makes sense for the novel, given that Phasma’s own origins revealed in the book feel very Mad Max-ian. And then, of course, Star Wars soundtracks—one from the film she debuted in, the next from the war-story spinoff—are solid choices, too.

But Foster the People’s “Houdini” is a particularly inspired addition, to say the least, and one that makes sense when you get to the end of the book. If you’re looking to check out Phasma, this is a worthy aural accompaniment.

James is a News Editor at io9. He wants pictures. Pictures of Spider-Man!

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DISCUSSION

jeredmayer
Jered Mayer

Incidentally, I had come up with a similar idea with a book I released last November. At the beginning was a list of tracks, separated by chapter but deliberately without instruction on how to listen to them (before each chapter, while you’re reading, after each chapter as you think back on what you just read). The idea was that while I knew which parts and emotions and memories I had in mind as I selected each song, each reader would hopefully have a unique experience when reading it, and that the music would add an additional layer connection. Also, to read it once without the music and once with, would there me a marked difference in what the reader got out of it? I also listed in the introduction how to find the Spotify list I compiled, to save the reader the trouble of tracking each song down one at a time.

Glad to see I wasn’t the only one with the idea. It’s super cool, and I think it adds a lot,