Image: Universal

Sometimes, the smallest spark can start a fire. And for David Hasselhoff, he’s hoping his small role in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 will remind people he too was in a classic science fiction series and let him bring it back in a suitably modern way.

That show, of course, is Knight Rider, which starred The Hoff as Michael Knight, a crime fighter who drove an artificially intelligent car named KITT. It returned as a rebooted TV series a few years back and the movie idea has been passed around Hollywood for years. But recently, Hasselhoff met a major filmmaker fan of the series and pitched him a new take.

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Speaking to Cinemablend, well, let’s just let The Hoff tell the story:

I have met Robert Rodriguez. He does Dusk til Dawn and Machete. And I said ‘You need to do Knight Rider.’ Because he was doing a marathon of Knight Riders and he said ‘Can we have a selfie!?’ And I said, ‘No, I don’t want a selfie! I want to do the movie! I want to shoot the TV series! I want to bring it back and make it dark! Michael Knight comes back and he’s pissed.’ ... I hope it happens, and if it does, it’ll be kind of like Logan. It will be dark. Hasselhoff as Michael Knight in 2017. Knight Rider. The saga continues.

I mean...sure? I think the problem with a Knight Rider movie isn’t the tone, exactly. It’s that technology, cars included, has escalated so quickly since the show was released, the whole premise is antiquated. And if you were to go full Logan, and set it in down and dirty world without the technology, you’re removing most of what made the show cool. Sorry, Michael Knight, but you were never the star of Knight Rider. It was KITT.

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But hey, you never know. Hollywood has rebooted just about everything imaginable in search for a bankable idea. Don’t forget, Hasselhoff himself showed up in a Baywatch movie this summer. But the actor said he does not want to go that way if this ever happened

“If it does go forward, I don’t want it to be spoofed like Baywatch or 21 Jump Street,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. Those films lose what it’s about, and you have to respect the fans.”

[Cinemablend]

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