Illustration for article titled Clone Factory Rejects Get All The Worst Jobs

You could make a thousand clones perfectly, but then suddenly have an entire batch go bad. They'd wander listlessly, refuse to learn language, pretend not to hear commands. Then you had to figure out how to get rid of them.

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Illustration for article titled Clone Factory Rejects Get All The Worst Jobs


Regulations said it had to be humane, which usually meant you couldn't kill them outright. You had to give them the kinds of jobs that didn't require much in the way of skills, or risk aversion.

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Illustration for article titled Clone Factory Rejects Get All The Worst Jobs

You could always turn the pretty ones into sex toys for lonely professional women with no time to cruise the cougar bars.

Illustration for article titled Clone Factory Rejects Get All The Worst Jobs

They turned out to be pretty good at detail work nobody else wanted. There were a million broken-down clones working as mute assistants to undertakers and nurses.


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Illustration for article titled Clone Factory Rejects Get All The Worst Jobs

They made good decorative security for robot-guarded factories and private homes.


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Illustration for article titled Clone Factory Rejects Get All The Worst Jobs

And of course they were perfect for toxic waste cleanup. At first, they even looked good doing it.

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Ben Lamberty is a photographer who takes portraits and highly-stylized fashion pictures. Many of his models look like clones or robots - or possibly some combination of both. You can see more of his work in his portfolio. [spotted on Feuilleton]

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