The world's food supplies will be hit hard by global warming, according to a study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters. The study's authors advise investing in irrigation and infrastructure to attenuate this loss, but what's less clear is where these measures should be taken. In fact, we probably won't know for at least 15 years.

Photo Credit: Ryan Wiedmaier via flickr | CC BY-NC 2.0

Via Reuters:

Where [irrigation] should be expanded is difficult to model because of competing scenarios on how rainfall will change, so the majority of irrigation investments should be made after 2030, the study said.

"If you don't carefully plan (where to spend resources), you will get adaptation wrong," David Leclere, one of the study's authors, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Infrastructure and processing chains will need to be built in areas where there was little agriculture before in order to expand production, he said.

International food markets will require closer integration to respond to global warming, as production will become more difficult in some southern regions, but new land further north will become available for growing crops.

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[Environmental Research Letters via Reuters]