Check out revealing set photos for Mockingjay and Game of Thrones!

Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
Morning SpoilersIf there’s news about upcoming movies and television you’re not supposed to know, you’ll find it in here.

The Fantastic Four reboot and Amazing Spider-Man 3 have both gotten new writers. See Katniss and Gale cuddling on the set of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay. And set photos reveal Game of Throne's new Daario. Spoilers ahead!

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Gravity

In an interview with Wired, Alfonso Cuarón says he is never going to do a space movie again:

I think I’d prefer to go to space. I will never do another space movie. I’m very proud of this; I loved every single second of the experience. But that’s it. It took me four and a half years—I’m ready to move on.

Why was it so hard?

We had to do the whole film as an animation first. We edited that animation, even with sound, just to make sure the timing worked with the sound effects and music. And once we were happy with it, we had to do the lighting in the animation as well. Then all that animation translated to actual camera moves and positions for the lighting and actors.

We did a whole exploration of the screenplay, every single moment; we made judgments about everything. Once we began shooting, we were constrained by the limitations of that programming.

How so?

We shot space scenes in a sort of virtual-reality box that had the characters’ environments projected on the walls. The actors had very little room to change their timing or their positions. But we adapted. Sandra Bullock trained like crazy to be able to be a part of all these technological challenges. It was choreography for her. I think her background as a dancer helped a lot. It was so much by numbers. After all the training and all the rehearsals, she was able to just focus on the emotional aspect of her performance

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More at the link. [Wired]


The Amazing Spider-Man 3

Apparently Sony's liking what they see on Amazing Spider-Man 2, because the studio's already secured the writing team (Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and Jeff Pinkner) for another outing. They also want to bring Marc Webb back to direct. [SlashFilm]


Hunger Games: Mockingjay

Go here for more of these set photos showing Liam Hemsworth and Jennifer Lawrence. And there's also more at the links. [Celebrity Gossip via Up & Comers]

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Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
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Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!

Thor: The Dark World

Go here for some photos, and here's a new TV spot. [Coming Soon]


The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

Here's the official long trailer:

And check out a new Gandalf banner. [Coming Soon]

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Ender's Game

Here's a new IMAX poster.

Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
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The Fantastic Four

There are more delays for this reboot, as Simon Kinberg (X-Men: Days of Future Past) has been hired to rewrite the script. Previous versions of the script have been tackled by a long list of writers, including Jeremy Slater, Michael Green, Seth Grahame-Smith and T.S. Nowlin. Kinberg is said to be "overhauling the script substantially." [Hollywood Reporter]

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Night People

This horror movie about high-tech thieves in a haunted house has started filming in Donegal, Ireland. The film is written and directed by Gerard Lough. [IFTN]

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Game of Thrones

Set photos have emerged showing the new Daario. [WENN.com and Winter Is Coming]

Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
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Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
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Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
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Here are some close ups, via WENN.com:

Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!
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Illustration for article titled Check out revealing set photos for emMockingjay/em and emGame of Thrones/em!

And go here for some more set photos. [Coming Soon]

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Once Upon a Time

Exec producer Adam Horowitz has a ton to say about Neverland as a "prism" for the whole show and about the Charming family:

In these first few episodes, we are really trying to use Neverland, and we continue to do it as the season progresses, as a prism through which we can see these characters hopefully more clearly and more equally. Layers will start to peel back on all of them, and that will continue going forward.

It's complicated - and hopefully in a good way - which is, that they're an unusual. There's this odd age thing going on between them - they're the same age - and also they've been separated for many, many years, and now they're thrown together on a mission, and really, for the first time, in an enclosed kind of space they're able to start to deal with and sort out some of these issues that they have.

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He also explains how the split of the season's going to work:

It is impacting, and we hope in a really positive way. In addition to two 11-episode arcs, the scheduling of running them more or less uninterrupted in both arcs allows us, hopefully, to really gain story momentum, and to really look at them as two mini-seasons that are hopefully thematically connected and building to one sort of big finish. It allows us to tell what we call the 'Neverland arc' in the first half, and in the second half tell the '[blank] arc' which we're not going to spoil just yet, which will grow out of where you see these first 11 end. As writers, it's been both challenging and really kind of freeing in a way, to allow us to really focus on giving a complete experience in the Fall and a complete experience in the Spring.

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More at the link. [K Site TV]

And here's a promo for Sunday's episode:


American Horror Story: Coven

Evan Peters will join the cast as Kyle Spencer, a frat brother at Kappa Alpha Gamma. [E! Online]

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And here's a five minute inside look at the season:


Atlantis

Go here for the complete gallery of episode 2. [Spoiler TV]

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The Vampire Diaries

Here's a poster of Stefan. [Spoiler TV]

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And a sneak peek at the fifth season premiere:


The Originals

You can check out the brand new director's cut of the pilot at the CW's site.


Agents of SHIELD

Here's the promo for next week's episode "The Asset"

Additional reporting by Charlie Jane Anders and Jason Krell

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DISCUSSION

I found this post by a woman who loves Transformers on the Something Awful forums' Transformers movies thread. She talks about the designs in Bay's films. The are more that she wrote about but I'm waiting for them to be completely collected in pdf form.

"Why are all these robots so damn ugly??

I feel one of the most misunderstood aspects of the films is their design language. Most people, including people who make tie-ins or fan art or frequently even the toys, seem to believe that the aesthetic of the Transformers begins and ends at MAXIMUM GREEBLIES. This is a sad disservice to the creative work of the designers, and has a lot to do with how we perceive visuals.

Looking at an image like this, I can totally forgive your eyes glazing over and developing a startling desire to just look at something else for a minute. Simply put, it’s a mess. The proportions are wack, no visual detail meaningfully flows into another, the colour balance and individual contrasts would probably get you thrown out of art school. And of course, this being his actual CGI model, this is a pretty good representation of what he looks like in the movie, right? Well, no.
We tend to think of “character designs” as a defined appearance carrying the character visually, effectively something the character “is”. This idea seems so self-evident I’m not even sure how to describe it without resorting to tautology, but it shows severe flaws in ignoring the differing role and task of our eyes in perceiving a similar construct in differing contexts.

To try and explain what I mean, I’ll have to get into what necessitated this kind of design language in the first place. Transformers (2007) presented a demand for special effects on an unprecedented scale, which presented a number of massive challenges for the entire crew, and particularly, of course, the animators. Beyond the obvious difficulties, there was also the very specific demand of having a number of scenes in bright daylight – a problem that ILM VFX supervisor Scott Farrar touches on in this lil’ video, explaining that of course, the usual preference is to keep the models out of light and out of focus so you don’t get to immediately see their flaws. That not being an option, the creators had to find different ways to make the effects not look fake.

A constant undercurrent in the first film’s construction is a general sense of insecurity. The team clearly wasn’t sure about how their work would look in the end, and they cut a lot of corners to ensure everything would look and behave smoothly, like only implying that Megatron has wings with the cinematography because ones actually on his back could get in the way of the action. The movie still spends much more time at night than the subsequent ones, and the Transformers spend very little time in the very centre of the screen, usually hanging out around the edges. In fact, one of my favourite bits of trivia about the first film is that it uses practical effects wherever possible.

Beyond using a unique CGI/miniature hybrid approach for some scenes, they also built physical props for parts of Skorponok, Frenzy, and, indeed, a full-scale Bumblebee for the scenes in which he wouldn’t have to move.

One of the big worries that must have come up in the actual design stage is that they had to avoid flat surfaces wherever possible. Making a simple, flat design like your average G1 Transformer look good as a CGI projection in a live-action context is near impossible because unless you expend obscene effort to get all the reflections and little textures just right, it’s always going to look, well, flat, and artificial. The sheer amounts of visual detail on the Transformers fulfils the dual purpose of a) breaking up the surfaces to slightly ease the work of the animators, and b) in conjunction with the framing choices of the film, they actively prevent the human eye from properly focusing on the things, which itself both more effective at “hiding the effect” than just keeping them in shadows and only showing them for seconds at a time. It also has a different, much more important purpose that goes back to filmmaking as a craft in general.

Check out this render of Optimus as he appears in the first film. What do you see? A large amount of mechanical junk, for one. But remember, that’s not what you see in the actual film. What you actually see is something more like this:

We have neither the opportunity nor a particular motivation to focus on all the details in the actual film context. What we do see in those split seconds of divided focus are, however, the imperative parts: The overall shape and lines of the design, what people in the artist’s trade call “gesture” or “figure” or “form” or like a million other things. If you haven’t heard of “gesture drawing”, it’s an exercise in which the artist attempts to capture the fundamental motion and attitude of their model in as few lines and details as possible, forgetting about the physical and visual details entirely to attain something much more fundamentally lifelike.

Random example from GIS"

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