Blown Glass Spaceships Scatter Seeds to the Stars

Illustration for article titled Blown Glass Spaceships Scatter Seeds to the Stars

Made of glass and recycled metals, these spaceships look like they were torn from the pages of rocket magazines in the 1930s. They're the battered but delicate stars of Rik Allen's show "Innersphere" at the Science Fiction Museum in Seattle, which runs through April 27. Allen, a master glass blower, said he wanted to pay homage to the science fiction he loved as a kid. Here are another two of his pieces, below.

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Allen added that the pieces are supposed to look like they might have lightning powering them, and that the yellow globes inside the rocket on the right are seeds that the ship is taking to spread life among the stars.

Illustration for article titled Blown Glass Spaceships Scatter Seeds to the Stars
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Rik Allen [Traver Gallery] (Thanks, Nick C!)

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DISCUSSION

Josh's stuff is more affordable (at least his smaller planets) because he has other artists make them in his studio, they're basically production stuff. His larger one of a kind pieces are very expensive.

Josh does get the space geek nod though, His wife, Katy, is an astronaut!

Handmade, one of a kind blown glass should be expensive, it's not easy to do and it's not cheap to run a studio. When we used to blow glass in our own studio (in the '90s) we would burn $1000-1500 of propane a month, imagine what that translates to now. that was just to keep the glass hot and workable (it's gotta be hot 24/7 during your season, no downtime for the furnace).

eakolb, you should say that you're a collector of lower priced glass art, that's fine and dandy. Everybody has to start somewhere, don't devalue his art simply because you can't afford it.