After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites

Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites

The Olympic Games are always proceded by a furious amount of building as host cities construct arenas, pools, ski jumps, Olympic villages, and anything else the games demand. While some of the buildings are repurposed after the athletes depart, others are left to rot.

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1936, Berlin

The Olympic Village

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Before the WWII it was converted into a military school, but after the war it was used by Soviet forces for decades.

Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites
Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites
Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites
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This image was lost some time after publication.
Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites

(via Slow Travel Berlin/Photo by Julia Stone, Flickr/Frederik Jacobs, DKB Stiftung, Fotocommunity/katinkahbg and Good Hard Working People)

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1924, Paris

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This is the place where the legendary "Flying Finn", Paavo Nurmi won five Gold medals, including two within an hour (1500m and 5000m).

(via Paris Invisible)

1948, London

The Wembley Palace of Engineering

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This building held the fencing competition in 1948. Partially demolished in 2006, and now it's a warehouse.

(via Wikimedia Commons/oxyman)

1952, Helsinki

Ahvenisto Swimming Pool

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Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites

(via Confidentielles)

1984, Sarajevo (Winter Olympics)

A Hotel on the way to Ski Jump

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The Ski Jumping Ramp

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Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites
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The Bobsleigh Track

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The Olympic Village

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(via Dark Optics, Karen Barlow/cloudlessness and kc1yr/Sharon Machlis Gartenberg)

2004, Athens

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Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites
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Illustration for article titled After the Games: Photographs of Decaying Olympic Sites
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(Photos by AP and Oceansvibe)

2008, Beijing

Beach Volleyball Stadium

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Kayaking Venue

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(via Limitless)

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DISCUSSION

Manfred
Casper Andersen

Isn´t it also a "thing" in China to have massive building projects that are no real use for, I seem to recall stories of malls with room for 100+ stores, with only 5-10 stores actually being open there. I believe it is done as a way to keep the economy rolling by creating jobs for people, at least for a time.