So, you’re playing a videogame and you spot a problem. You should alert the company, and eagerly await your patch to come through, right? Probably not. Here, a videogame tester explains why.

io9’s comment of the day today comes from commenter and videogame tester NeoSocrateS who explains why the bug you’re so eagerly telling them about is probably already known — and unlikely to ever get fixed:

This does not mean I spend the whole day playing games in a awesome and enjoyable fashion.

This means I will drive my car relentlessly along the same wall on the same race track at differing angles and speeds to see if I can clip out.

This means I will then tick off one section of the enormous test script I spent the previous 2 days writing and proceed to case #234.

This means occasionally I will write a bug report in excessive detail to show where the issue is when I do clip out.

This means I will then need to negotiate with PMs/Devs/BAs and other testers to justify my fault and how its worth for addressing prior to release.

This means I will get more stressed than any fan boy when my batch of 14 defects are deemed “not required for release” and I have half a day til launch to prove the entire health system works as designed when it clearly doesn’t.

In truth the QAs more than likely found every defect you did, they will have reported them steadfastly, and someone who is not thought of as a “barrier to progress” will have decided it wasn’t worth fixing in case it messed with the artificial producer’s deadline.

Just remember that next if the QA team were allowed to respond to your complaints on the forum the most common phrase would be “We know!”.

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