A Satellite View of Tennessee's Kingston Fossil Plant, Before and After the Toxic Spill

Illustration for article titled A Satellite View of Tennessees Kingston Fossil Plant, Before and After the Toxic Spill

As you've probably heard, a containment area for toxic fly ash (a byproduct of fossil fuel production) burst open last month in Tennessee, U.S. As a result, 1.3 million cubic meters of ash slurry oozed over the countryside, covering homes and getting into local rivers. NASA's Landsat 5 satellite captured these images before and after the event. Above, you can see the area in November, before the spill. Dark blue water is unpolluted; pale blue water contains sediment.

Advertisement

Below is the area soon after the breach. You can see the rivers around the area are pale blue, full of the toxic slurry. And the landscape itself around the plant are blackened by the ash.

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled A Satellite View of Tennessees Kingston Fossil Plant, Before and After the Toxic Spill

SOURCE: NASA Earth Observatory

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

This is clearly a natural phenomenon that humanity had no hand in creating and had no way to prevent or control. Toxic fly ash spills are just a part of a normal cycle of nature. Extremist environmentalists would want us to spend ridiculous amounts of money to prevent toxic spills like this, but we must not let their hard-left ideology and heavily biased "scientists" steer us onto a course that would destroy our economy in a vain attempt to interfere with toxic spills — one of the natural wonders of our world!