In the days of duck-and-cover drills and atomic anxiety, many families bought space in bomb shelters, stocking and decorating their possible nuclear homes. Richard Ross's photographs capture the abandoned shelters and what some families planned to take to the apocalypse.

Ross's book Waiting for the End of the World contains photographs and accounts of bomb shelters from across America, Europe, and Asia. Below are photos from just a few of those shelters: shelters in Sanpete and Salt Lake City, Utah, the Phillip Hoag and Charlie Hull Shelters in Emigrant, Montana, oil tycoon's Ling Chieh Kung's shelter in Conroe, Texas, and a public shelter near Zurich.

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Picture Show: Waiting for the End of the World [GOOD Magazine via Presurfer]

Kitchen in shelter in Sanpete, Utah

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Entrance to shelter in Sanpete, Utah

Storage Shelves in Sanpete, Utah

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Entrance to shelter in Salt Lake City, Utah

Traverse tunnel in shelter in Salt Lake City, Utah

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Entrance to Phillip Hoag Shelter in Emigrant, Montana

Communications tower for Phillip Hoag Shelter in Emigrant, Montana

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Entrance to Kung's shelter in Conroe, Texas

Jail cells in Kung's shelter in Conroe, Texas

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Operating room in Kung's shelter in Conroe, Texas

Bedroom in Charlie Hull Shelter in Emigrant, Montana

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Bedroom in Charlie Hull Shelter in Emigrant, Montana

Living room in Charlie Hull Shelter in Emigrant, Montana

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Air filters in public shelter near Zurich, Switzerland

Doors to public shelter near Zurich, Switzerland

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Personal unit in public shelter near Zurich, Switzerland