The next time you're driving, you might want to be on the lookout for bees. If you see one or two, no big deal. But if you see two million of them cruising down the highway, hanging out on the back of a flat-bed truck, congratulations — you've witnessed someone doing the unique job of bee transporter.

If you've taken a drive through any state where people make their living off of agriculture, you've probably spent time looking out the window at mile after mile of orange trees, almond trees, strawberry plants, or any other kind of vegetable matter that humans enjoy eating. Those plants need to be pollinated, and when they're in bloom, pollination is no problem. When they stop putting out flowers, any permanent hive of bees in the area will starve... unless they can be moved around to a new area where the trees are blooming and in need of pollination. Mobile hives are one of the innovations of modern agriculture.

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I reached out to the poster of this video, who does a series of YouTube videos about beekeeping, and asked about this feeding time. According to our beekeeping instructor: "Growing colonies must have pollen. On average colonies can get all the pollen they need from foraging but when the hives are being moved a lot or there are too many at one location pollen must be supplemented."

And so we see bees foraging off the pollen spread out on the back of a truck. They seem pretty mellow. If you watch the video all the way through, you can see a man walk up to the truck and wave his hands through the bee cloud. You can also see a big metal drum full of pollen — pollen available to anyone who orders it. Is anyone tempted to get one, dump it in your back yard, and play Queen of the Bees?

Thank you to 628DirtRooster for the video!