Hedge mazes, corn mazes, and the like may confound our senses when we’re inside trying to find our way out, but when viewed from above, some of them are particularly beautiful. Here are some of the loveliest mazes that you can lose yourself in.

Parc del Laberint d’Horta, a historical garden in Barcelona, Spain, with a maze planted in 1791

Edmonton Corn Maze, a maze cut into a corn field every year since 2001, west of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

The second largest symbolic hedge maze in the world, the Marlborough Maze at Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, England, planted in 1987, opened in 1991.

Julian’s Bower, a turf maze in Alkborough, England, first mentioned by Abraham de la Pryme around 1700

The Hampton Court Maze at Hampton Court Palace, London, UK, planted between 1689 and 1695 by Henry Wise and George London for William III of Orange

The Longleat Maze in the garden of Longleat House in Horningsham, England, created by one of its owners named Alexander Thynn, the 7th Marquess of Bath (1932-)

A cherry laurel maze, created in 1833, in Glendurgan Garden, near Falmouth, Cornwall, England