“All the Worlds to See” by Julie Dillon (2015) via Kickstarter

The Museum of Science Fiction is building off the success of its Journal of Science Fiction by launching a new publication that’s less academic in nature: Catalysts, Explorers & Secret Keepers: Women of Science Fiction, an anthology highlighting the important roles women have played in scifi—be they authors, readers, or characters. And you can be a part of it.


The book, with a cover by Hugo award-winning artist Julie Dillon, will contain both reprinted and original works, some of which will be curated from an open call that’ll happen once the museum reaches its funding goal. So step one is to check out the Kickstarter page and donate some dollars ($18 gets you a print copy of the book; $8 gets you an e-book version) before November 1.

Step two, if you’re an author, is to get your work ready to submit. If you’re chosen, not only will you be included in the book, you’ll be paid the standard Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America per-word rates. You’ll also get an invite to next year’s Escape Velocity, the Museum of Science Fiction’s annual scifi celebration.


Here’s a bit more about the book, and the way the Museum of Science Fiction is packaging the project as a “take-home exhibit.”

Our team at the Museum of Science Fiction believes an anthology of science fiction is the perfect take-home exhibit. Many museums publish books to provide context and background to highlight their special, temporary exhibits. We’ve decided to build on this principle and create a curated science fiction anthology as an exhibit meant to be taken home, experienced at your own pace, and shared.

Showcasing the works of science fiction greats allows us to illustrate their influences on the genre, while rounding out the anthology with unsolicited talent helps us better recognize and celebrate how writers help shape the ever-changing nature of science fiction and its future. Science fiction grows and changes every day, and short stories have been one of the genre’s hallmarks for much of its history. By creating an exhibit of notable short science fiction pieces, we illustrate how the short fiction market has shaped science fiction as we know it.

Any money left over from the campaign, after the authors and artist are paid and the books are completed, will go toward another good cause: the museum’s educational programs, held in Washington, DC, where a brick-and-mortar version of the museum is currently in the works.