Forget the Sinister Six; if Andrew Garfield is correct, Spider-Man's most dangerous foes may be Sony executives. The star says the reason Amazing Spider-Man 2 flopped is because of interference from the studio, which removed too much of the story and left the movie a bit of a mess.

Here's Garfield hating Mondays discussing it with The Daily Beast:

For me, I read the script that Alex [Kurtzman] and Bob [Orci] wrote, and I genuinely loved it. There was this thread running through it. I think what happened was, through the pre-production, production, and post-production, when you have something that works as a whole, and then you start removing portions of it—because there was even more of it than was in the final cut, and everything was related. Once you start removing things and saying, "No, that doesn't work," then the thread is broken, and it's hard to go with the flow of the story. Certain people at the studio had problems with certain parts of it, and ultimately the studio is the final say in those movies because they're the tentpoles, so you have to answer to those people.

But I'll tell you this: Talking about the experience as opposed to how it was perceived, I got to work in deep scenes that you don't usually see in comic book movies, and I got to explore this orphan boy—a lot of which was taken out, and which we'd explored more. It's interesting to do a postmortem. I'm proud of a lot of it and had a good time, and was a bit taken aback by the response.

I'm not sure how to feel about this. I mean, studio interference has been around as long as Hollywood has, and it's rare that they have ideas that actually improve the movies they release. On the other hand, the final run time of Amazing Spider-Man 2 was still two hours and 22 minutes — which is pretty damn long. Surely there was some point in the process where director Marc Webb realized this movie was going to be an untenable three hours long, and could figure out a way to tighten the movie without losing "the flow of the story," as it were.

Advertisement

Also, I doubt there were any scenes Sony cut that would have made why Peter Parker refused to give his blood to his best friend to save his life any more explicable.

[Via IGN]