Universal has just announced a slate of new genre TV shows, including three new adaptations of fantasy and scifi books. But hidden among those are the first details about Dan Harmon and Evan Katz’s next TV series: Sirens of Titan, an interplanetary epic based on the Kurt Vonnegut novel.

Sirens of Titan follows the richest man in 22nd-Century America, Malachi Constant, who gathers his wealth through his “extraordinary luck” he believes is a divine power. But Constant’s luck runs out when he’s flung across the galaxy in a journey that sees him avoid a deadly war on Mars, flee to Mercury, be brought back to Earth in disgrace, and finally travel to Titan to meet the person behind his sudden downfall—a man named Winston Niles Rumfoord.

On top of that, Universal also revealed plans to adapt three book series, two of which will air on Syfy: Maggie Stiefvater’s urban fantasy saga The Raven Cycle—about a young girl and a group of private school boys on a quest for a magical power—showrun by Andrew Miller (The Secret Circle) and Catherine Hardwicke (Twilight), and Hugh Howey’s Sand, a post-apocalyptic drama surrounding a family of “sand divers” who scour the ravaged remnants of an ecologically devastated Earth for valuable objects produced by Book of Eli and former Rogue One writer Garry Whitta and directed by World War Z’s Marc Forster.

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The third series, which currently does not have an attached network is an adaptation of Roger Zelazny’s classic novel Lord of Light, written by X-Men: First Class and Thor co-writer Ashley Miller, which follows a society of humans where a select few can be granted the likeness and powers of deities, and one former god that rises up to challenge the status quo.

It’s a ridiculously packed slate—and one that doesn’t even include things like Universal’s previous deals with Dark Horse to bring comics like Umbrella Academy to the small screen, or last year’s announcement of an Alfred Hitchcock anthology series. Either way, we can expect a ton of intriguing new genre shows to hit our TV screens in the relatively near future.